refrigerator-magnet-activities

11 Fridge Magnet Activities for Kids

Fun Fridge Magnet Activities

To entertain your little ones, all you need is a few magnets. Better yet, magnets are all you need to educate your kids with various fun activities. From those who are homeschooled and needing a few extra projects to those who need a few ideas for the summer while there is not school, there are hundreds of activities that offer hours of enjoyment. Simply begin by grabbing your magnets, metal objects and other household things you have lying around and read through these amazingly simple ideas.

Fun Magnetic Scavenger Hunt

Give your child a fridge magnet to take around your home or classroom. Have your child or children practice by finding objects that are magnetic. Have them make a list of the objects they found or draw a picture. This is fun for all ages! Whoever finds the most objects wins!

Needle in a Haystack

Give each child a stick with a magnet tied to it. Place a large amount of objects in a bin or box such as pencils, shoes, paper clips, crumbled paper, etc. Have the children “fish” for magnetic items using their poles. You can split them into groups to make this a fun game for all.

Twist on the Haystack

Place the letter and number magnets in a bin of random items. Allow each child to fish for the letters and put them in the correct order as they find them.

How Strong? 

Give each child in your group a different size magnet. Have each child find objects that the magnet can hold, starting off small. Have each child continue with this until they find an object that the magnet cannot hold. This test of strength is a great learning activity for all age groups.

Spelling

Give each child a metal cookie sheet with a set of letter magnets. Call out spelling words for them and allow them to search for the correct letters to place on their sheet. You can create a game by seeing who can spell the fastest.

Math

Give each child a metal cookie sheet and a set of numbers and math symbol magnets. Allow them to create their own equations and then trade them with a partner. Have the partner answer the question using their magnets.

Floating Paperclip

Magnets are amazing! Have each child take a paper clip to a string and hold it. Have another child take a magnet and move it towards the paperclip. The string will not allow it to touch, so it will hover in the air.

Magnet Painting

Use your fridge magnets as stencils for custom cards, paintings and more! Give each child a set of different size magnets and let me create their own work of art!

Funny Sentences

Give each child a set of letter magnets and let the games begin. Allow each child to create a word with their magnet. If you have more than one child in the group, let them add another word and so on. The sentence will take on a funny structure and the story will continue.

Funny Face

Find some random fridge magnets and allow each child to make the funniest face they can imagine on the fridge or a metal sheet.

Close Your Eyes

Give each child some random letter magnets. Blindfold each child and have them place the letters on the fridge in front of them. Guessing what each letter is by touching it, have them come up with a word with the magnets. They may…or may not…have the correct spelling when they peek.

Magnets are an amazing and budget friendly way to enjoy time with the kids or educate your students. Enjoy the fun by trying these various activities!

icebreakers-for-kids

Indoor Recess Games

17 Indoor Recess Games

Recess is a very important part of the school day.  Children use their recess time to socialize with their friends, expend some of their boundless energy and have some fun.  A recess period filled with exciting activities helps the children stay fit and lifts their mood.  When they come back into the classroom they are usually happy, relaxed and ready to learn!

However, what are your options when the weather turns bad and the children can no longer play outdoors?  Here are 17 indoor recess games that will keep the children entertained when they cannot have recess outdoors.  They are great stress relievers for children and will help them enjoy their time in the classroom!

Charades

Charades can be enjoyed by children of all ages.  It is a creative and social game that really asks children to use their imaginations.

How to play charades with children:

  1. Split the children into two or more teams.
  2. Explain the basic rules of charades to the children if they have never played it before.  Consider showing them a few examples.
  3. Choose a player from one team to start the game.  They must think of a famous person, movie title, song title or book title.  You may wish to limit the topics in some way, for example they might have to use the title of an animated movie they have watched.
  4. The player then performs a pantomime and the audience guesses what it is.  The first person to guess the charade scores a point for their team.

Make sure to teach the children the common clues that are used in charades.  For example, using fingers to indicate the number of words, pretending to sing to indicate it is a song, or tugging your ear to indicate it “sounds like” something.

Pass the chicken

This game tests the ability of students to think quickly and to remember the things they have learnt in class.

  1. Have the students sit in a circle
  2. Give a random student a rubber chicken (or some other squeaky toy), then ask them a question like “Can you name 5 United States presidents?”
  3. Have the students pass the chicken in a clockwise direction.  The first student must answer the question before the rubber chicken makes it all the way around the circle.
  4. If they manage to answer the question in time, the student who is currently holding the chicken must answer the next question.  If they don’t answer the question in time, they have to give the chicken a good squeeze and do a chicken dance!

Balloon games

If the children in your class are full of energy, a balloon game may be the answer!  You can even incorporate learning activities into balloon games to obtain more value from the experience.  Some of the best ballon games for indoor recess include:

Balloon juggling

Keeping balloons floating in the air can be challenging, especially when there are dozens of balloons floating around.  You can have free-for-all balloon juggling where all of the kids attempt to keep balloons floating, or split the class into teams.  Assign different colors to the teams and tell them they have to corral the balloons of that color into a specific corner of the classroom.  If a balloon hits the floor, it can’t be used again.  Each team can hit the other team’s balloons in the wrong direction.  The team that gets the most balloons into the corner wins!  Yes it will be chaos, but it will also be incredible fun for the kids.

Catch the balloon

Have the group stand in a circle and hit the balloon into the air.  Call a child’s name at random.  They must run into the centre and hit the balloon into the air before it touches the ground.  As they hit the balloon, they must call the name of another person in the circle, who will go next.  This is a simple game that also works well as an introductory icebreaker.

Balloon balancing races

Students are given a balloon each.  They must balance it on one finger and attempt to walk across the room without dropping it.  The first to the other side wins!

Balloon volleyball

Split the class into two teams and run a net or piece of string across the middle of the room.  Have the teams hit the balloon over the net as if they were playing volleyball.  If a team lets the balloon hit the ground, the other team gets a point.  The first team to 10 points wins.

Let’s Dance

Young children just love dancing!  It’s a great indoor activity that helps the kids in class relax, socialize and have fun.  You can simply have the class dance to a few Wiggles songs or play a dancing game.  The most popular dancing games include:

Dance freeze

Have the class dance until the music stops — when they have to freeze their current dance pose.  You can give out prizes for the funniest frozen dance pose.

Musical chairs

A classic game that is still a lot of fun for young children.  Set up chairs in a circle around the room and have your students dance their way around the chairs.  Have one fewer chair than the number of students currently dancing.  When the music stops, they have to scramble for a chair.  Students who don’t get a chair are out for the round.  Constantly reduce the number of chairs as the number of players shrinks.

Board Games and Card Games

Board games are great fun on a rainy day!  Look for board games that are educational, enjoyable, and/or social.  Many classic board games like Scrabble, Monopoly, Chess, Clue, and Chinese Checkers can help the children develop their cognitive abilities.

You can also teach the children how to play card games like Uno, Poker, Solitaire, Hearts, Bridge or Spades.  Most children find learning a new card game interesting and it is useful knowledge that they will have for the rest of their lives.

Four Corners


This is a popular indoor recess game that young children love!  It is also simple to play:

  1. Designate each of the corner with a number (1 to 4).
  2. Have the children in the class spread out between the 4 corners.
  3. Select one child to sit in the middle and be the first counter.  They will close their eyes and count to 10, then they will call out one of  the 4 numbers.
  4. The children in that corner will sit down and are out of the game.  Children can move between corners while the child in the middle is counting — but they must be standing in a corner before the counter reaches 10.
  5. The last child standing in a corner is the winner!

Getting warmer

Select one of the students in the room to be the “searcher”.  Have them leave the room for a short period of time while the rest of the class selects a random item in the room to be the “treasure”.  The searcher comes back into the room and tries to locate the treasure while students tell them if they are “cold” “getting warmer” or “hot” depending on how close they are to the object.

Build something!

Split the children into groups and have them build something using lego or craft supplies.  The item they build can be decorative or functional.  You can even ask the children to build a gadget that achieves a specific task like shooting a ping pong ball across the room.  You will be amazed by the creations that children can make with Lego, rubber bands and pop sticks!

If the children make something they are really proud of, be sure to take photographs or video footage of their creation.  You can then upload the images to a website so the children can show it to their parents.  Constructing items in groups will make the children think creatively, collaborate, and communicate with one another.

Chain Reaction

This is another simple game that will test the memory of your students!

  1. The teacher writes a category on the chalkboard.  For example, foods, places, animals, movies or books.
  2. Students have to think of a word form the category that matches each letter of the alphabet.  For example, if the category was food, they could write Apple, Banana, Cucumber and so on.  They have 5 minutes to write their list.
  3. The teaches asks the first student for a word from their list which matches a random letter.  For example, they might say “Give me a food starting with P”.  The student might reply “Pineapple!”.
  4. The next student in the group has to provide a word that ends with the last letter of the previous word — in this case, a word starting with E (the last letter of Pineapple).  If the student does not have a matching word on their sheet that they can use, they get 5 seconds to think of another one.  If they fail, they are eliminated!

Captain’s Orders

This game will get your children moving, having fun and thinking at the same time!  It can easily be adapted to suit children aged anywhere between 5 and 10.

  1. Select one child to be the captain.  They will stand at the front of the classroom
  2. The other children will stand in a straight line, facing their captain — they are the ship’s “crew”.
  3. The captain is given a sheet up paper with a list of commands they can use.  You should explain and demonstrate each of the commands to the crew.
  4. The captain begins to quickly issue commands to their crew.  The crew has to do their best to keep up!

The commands include things like:

  • “Scrub the deck” — Quickly get down on hands and knees and pretend to scrub the floor
  • “Captain on deck”  — The crew must quickly salute the captain
  • “Big wave coming” — The crew must run to the back of the room
  • “Raise the sails” — The crew pretends to be pulling on a rope

The quicker the captain performs the calls, the more difficult (and fun) the game becomes!

The Animal Game

This is a really simple game that is fun for younger children.

  1. Think of a random animal and tell the class
  2. The students must pretend to be that animal for 30 seconds
  3. You can offer prizes or animal stickers to the most compelling animal!

Toss and Talk

This activity can be great fun and helps the students to learn more about each other.  Buy a large plastic ball and write a number of questions on it.  For example:

  • “Who is your favorite celebrity?”
  • “Do you have a pet?”
  • “What is your favorite candy?”
  • “What’s your favorite color?”

Have the students stand in a circle and bounce the ball at one another.  When they catch the ball, they have to answer the question on the top!

The 100 Cup Challenge

This game will test the ingenuity of your young students!  Split your classroom into groups of 4 or 5 students.  Give each group 100 plastic cups.  Instruct them to build a structure as tall as possible.  You might wish to give teams a time limit or specify some other objective as well — like having the structure support a flag.  You could also incorporate a few other building materials like spaghetti, string or sticky tape to give the children a bit more creative freedom.

Don’t fall in the volcano!

This is a simple game that is lot of fun and gives children a chance to use some of their energy.  Place pieces of paper on the ground which lead from one side of the room to the other.  Have multiple trails, some with the pieces of paper close together, others where they are far apart.

The children must pretend the floor is made of hot lava and the pieces of paper are rocks.  They must get from one side of the room to the other using the rocks.  If they fall into the lava they are out of the game.

You can make things more interesting by having the children choose their own path.  They can choose the hard path with fewer pieces of paper or the easy path.  Have the children start at the same time and tell them when they are allowed to move forward.  If they have chosen a hard path, they will get to the other side faster but the risk of falling in is higher.  You can have the children cross the volcano multiple times until there is only one person left.  

Museum Guard Game

This game tests the ability of students to stand still and concentrate.

  1. Select a student to be the “museum guard”.  This student stands at the front of the room and face away from the students.
  2. Have the other students pretend to be “exhibitions” at the museum — they can be animals or people.  Whenever the guard is not looking the exhibitions can walk around the museum.
  3. When the guard turns around to inspect the exhibitions, the children must immediately stop moving.
  4. The museum guard can select any exhibitions that are moving, talking or laughing.  They will be out of the game until the next round.
  5. The last exhibition standing is the winner!  They get to be the next museum guard.

Doggy Doggy

This is another simple game that young children absolutely love.  It is easy to understand and is guaranteed to generate some laughs.

  1. Nominate a player to be the “doggy”.  They stand in the hallway with a friend for a couple of minutes.
  2. Give a random student a plastic dog bone or rubber chicken to hide in their desk or under their chair.
  3. Ask the doggy to come back into the room and look for their bone or chicken.  While the doggy is searching, the class sings the doggy doggy song — “Doggy doggy, where’s your bone?  Somebody stole it from your home!  Guess who!  It might be you… It might be the monkey from your zoo!”
  4. The doggy looks at the expressions on the faces of the other children for any hints about who has it.  They get three chances to choose the classmate with the toy.
  5. If they are wrong, the child with the toy gets to be the new doggy.  If they are right, they get to be the doggy again!

Who is Our Pablo Picasso?

Give the children 15 minutes to create a work of art.  It can be a painting, a sculpture, a coloring book image, pipe cleaner jewelry, or a drawing.  Once they have finished creating their art works, display them all at the front of the classroom.  Have the students vote on their favorite art work and give the student with the most votes a prize!

We hope you enjoyed reading 17 indoor recess games!  These games can make a rainy day an exciting experience for the kids in your class!

youth-group-icebreakers

Indoor Team Building Games

17 Fun Indoor Team Building Games

There is nothing more important than a group of people having the ability to work together as a team, especially in the work force. It is, however, not always easy for all persons to work collaboratively. Team building games really help to promote and foster relationships in which the individuals trust one another and work together in a positive and productive manner.

There are many options for great indoor team building games and exercises. Below, I’ve compiled 17 of the best!

1.) 3 Truths and a Lie

In this fun, getting-to-know-you team building activity, each person gets a chance to state three truths about themselves and one lie, to the rest of the group. The truths may be as fun and creative as you would like, or as simple as you may choose. The lie must not be so far-fetched that it is completely unbelievable (i.e., “I swam the English Channel with my arms tied behind my back and a shark chasing me.”). Everyone should discuss what they believe are the truths and which is the lie. After they come to a united decision, the speaker will reveal if they are correct or not.

This is a great game to help everyone become acquainted with one another. It also helps the quieter people of the group who may more easily remain mum if allowed, break out and get to be known by others. In addition, it allows for the participants to learn a bit about themselves as well as others based on the lies they believed to be true.

2.) Scavenger Hunt

An oldie but a goodie: you likely remember this game from your childhood. Small groups should be made to create teams whom work together with the common goal of finding the objects or answers needed from their scavenger hunt list. The answers or items being sought out should all be work or event-related. A time limit should be given for the groups to find as many objects and answers as they possibly can. Some will be quite easy, but others will really require them to work together as they will be a bit more difficult.

This promotes united teamwork. When the game is done everyone will have been reminded of different work/event procedures and policies as they will have been incorporated in their lists for answers or items to find. This is ideal when large indoor spaces are available. 

3.) Hello My Name Is

Write adjectives describing someone’s mood or personality (i.e., happy, grouchy, negative, prankster) on name tag stickers. Be sure there is enough for each person to have one. Then randomly hand them out or let each person draw one from a hat. Each person must then put the sticker with their assigned adjective on to their shirt and wear it, behaving as their assigned adjective during all interactions for a certain amount of time.

This is a great activity that shows each person that when we define them by a feeling – “Boy, you’re really grumpy today!” – it can actually lead us to take on that persona, whether we were feeling that way or not. This of course can be a good thing or a bad thing – acting happy can in fact make you feel happy!  This shows how behavior and actions can actually define our feelings, not the other way around.

4.) Big Foot

This is a fun, albeit tricky game, in which everyone must stand up in a single file line. All the players are then blindfolded so that they cannot see. They are then instructed to put themselves in line in order of smallest foot to biggest foot. Caveat: they cannot ask or state anyone’s shoe size.

This is a great game that demands teamwork to communicate efficiently in order get into line properly without the use of sight or verbalizing the most basic and obvious of information: shoe size.

5.) See What I Mean?

In this challenging team building activity one person draws a picture using only basic shapes and a volunteer than describes the picture drawn to everyone else. Without seeing the picture, each person much try to reproduce the picture based solely on what the volunteer is relaying to them with the ultimate goal being that they are able to create the same picture.

In this game it is unlikely that anyone in the group will reproduce a carbon copy – some pictures will be more similar than others. This activity emphasizes how very important verbal communication is, and also how it can be vastly interpreted by different people. To really drive the point home you could do a few rounds of this game, which would also exhibit how some people interpret directions and communication differently from others and how certain methods are more easily understood than others.

6.) Zombie Escape

In this thrilling game everyone will be “locked” in a room with a “zombie.” One person will be the zombie, complete with outstretched arms and zombie noises, and they will be tied to a rope in the corner. Every five minutes the zombie will be given an extra foot of leeway on the rope, eventually being close enough to “eat” the other players. Before the zombie gets that far, however, the group will have a series of puzzles, riddles, or clues they must complete in order to find the key and escape the room intact.

This activity fosters collaborative teamwork and creative problem solving skills, as everyone must work together to figure out the clues in a high-stress situation in order to get out. This also helps to show which individuals have a more difficult time in stressful situations, which people flourish in them, and helps to bring out real team leaders.

7.) What’s My Name?

Write the name of famous present or past figures, or of people types such as nurse, geek, blind, homeless on to a name tag place one on to the back of each person in the room so that they cannot see the name tag, but everyone else in the room can.

The group then may socialize with one another for a set amount of time, asking questions in order to try and figure out who they are. Others will treat them in stereotypical ways based on who their label says they are. Each person can use the answers to their questions, as well their treatment, to ascertain who they are. Once they have correctly identified their label, they may leave the game until everyone has finished.

This is a really great ice-breaker game, but also allows each person to confront stereotypes in the questions used and the answers given, as well as by how they treated others and other treated them based solely on their label. It permits each person to get a better idea of how we erroneously perceive people, as well as how it feels to be so narrowly characterized by a simple label.

8.) Get to Know Me!

In this activity request everyone to pair off into twos with people they were not sitting near and/or do not know well. The pairs will then ask one another three questions: 1.) Name something that you are very proud of in your work and/or personal life. 2.) Tell something about yourself that very few people know about. 3.) Interviewers choice: any question can be asked. Afterwards, each person will share with the large group what they learned about their partner.

This is a fun and effective way to get to better know your colleagues, especially those whom you may not interact with often.

9.) Kid’s Stuff

For this creative challenge, you will all work together to create a board game based on the work your business or event conducts. Using basic and limited supplies, such as poster board and markers, everyone will work together using their imaginations to create a fun and interactive game. The game may include questions focused on the business that must be answered at certain game spots, ways to earn/lose points or move forwards/backwards. Perhaps a dice will move you forward? The sky is the limit.

This exercise will force each person to work collaboratively and give their input in order to create a board game that is fun for everyone.

10.) Spider Web

In Spider Web have the group form a large circle. It may be standing or sitting; if it is a very large group, you may prefer to sit. One person will hold a large ball of twine and then tell the group an embarrassing story about themselves. Afterwards, they will then hold onto the end of the twine and throw it to someone else in the circle, extending the twine from themselves to the next person. That person will then also tell an embarrassing story about his or herself and throw the twine to another person while keeping a hold of it as well. This will continue until the twine has been passed to each person and each person has had the opportunity to humor the group with an embarrassing story of his or hers own. The end result will produce a “spider web” out of the twine, connecting everyone to each other.

This team building game shows how each person, no matter how different, is connected in one or way or another to each other person. It also allows each person to see how everyone may have vastly different experiences, but they all experience the same emotions and feelings. Though you may be very different people, you are also more alike and connected than you realize.

11.) Group Timeline

Create a large timeline on a white board, bulletin board, or whatever other means you may prefer. Mark the very beginning of the timeline back to either when the oldest participant in the group was born, or when the business or event was first founded; whichever occurred first. Then mark off any major milestones for the business or event, such as “Change of Name” or “Celebrated 50 years,” etc.

Then allow each person in the group to mark four important moments for them on the timeline; whether it be personal or business/event related; it is completely up to them.

When the timeline is completed it will show a visual representation of your whole team and their generational experiences. This allows for dialogue on generational and cultural differences and how they affect work and communication, as well as general differences and similarities.

12.) Plane Crash

In this team building activity you will imagine that your group was in a plane crash and are now stranded on a deserted island. This can be done as one large group, or you can break off into smaller groups. The group must then choose 12 items that can be found in the building that they believe to be the most useful for their survival on their deserted island, and rank them in order of most importance to least.

This focuses on teamwork and collaboration, as well as creative problem solving and thinking outside of the box, as they may very likely have to make do with items they would not pick if not so limited.

13.) Watch Where You Step

Make a polygonal shape on the floor using masking tape that is at least 12 feet by 6 feet. Make the outline of the shape a tad complicated, selecting a shape that is stretched out as people will be making their way from one end to the other. Be sure there are starting and stopping points marked. Put a handful of squeaky dog toys inside of the taped shape, and at least double the amount of sheets of paper, each with a huge X on them, inside of the shape. The papers are mines.

In groups of two, each person will be blindfolded and must make it from start to finish through the minefield. The only direction is from the verbal instructions coming from those whom are outside of the shape and not blindfolded. The blindfolded participants may not step outside of the shape enclosure, nor may the step on a mine. If they do, they are frozen until someone else steps on a squeaky toy in order to unfreeze them. This occurs until the entire group has had a turn to make it successfully through the minefield.

This teambuilding exercise works on communication and teamwork, as well as clear diction and the ability to be vigilant of numerous actions at once.

14.) Use What You Have

In this fun game, split your group into two equal groups. Or if needed, several equal groups. Give them clear instructions for a goal in which they must create something: the something is completely up to you. It may be that they must create a way to move a marble from point A to point B without the use of electricity or rubber bands; it can really be anything. Each group has the same goal and the same restrictions.

The teams are then given a specific amount of time to work and complete the mission with a particular set of supplies. They are not allowed to use any other materials, but how they use the supplies available to them is entirely up to them. The big reveal at the end is an exciting event, and allows for friendly competition.

This activity requires teamwork in creative problem solving with limited options. It allows for the groups to see how each person thinks and works abstractly and in a time-crunch.

15.) Find the Common Thread

Divide everyone into groups of three or more. They will talk and get to know one another long enough to find a common thread amongst them, such as they all love zombie movies or they’re huge football fans. They will then write a list of common stereotypes attributed toward people who tend to enjoy those sorts of things.

The groups will then come together and proclaim who they as a group are. For the rest of the day each group will behave as their stereotype: perhaps the zombie-lovers will be overheard making zombie apocalyptic plans, or acting like zombies. Football aficionados may randomly cheer for their team. At the end of the day discuss stereotypes and how they often limit how we view people and their abilities. Also discuss how each group came about discovering their common thread.

The purpose of this teambuilding game is to help everyone see how silly and limiting stereotypes are, and how if people truly behaved the way we often write them off to act, things would be vastly different. It also shows how a group of seemingly very different people can have great commonalities that bring them together.

16.) Someone You Admire

This game is as straightforward as the name. Each person will take a turn stating someone whom they admire; it may be a current person or someone from history. You could also spice it up a bit and make it be someone within the group. Each person must also tell why they admire that person; what traits, attributes, and/or accomplishments make that person worthy of admiration.

This exercise really helps everyone get to know one another better and have a stronger sense of each other’s values and what attributes they find to be important. It also can help bring people closer together as they realize they respect and admire the same people.

17.) Classify This

Collect at least 20 different items and set them on a table. The broader the category, the better (i.e., jewelry, office supplies, etc.). You want for these items, at first glimpse, to have no obvious connection to each other.

Then break everyone into equal teams, armed with a pen and paper. They must then classify the objects into four groups. They may do this however they choose, working together, not allowing other groups to hear. Once all the groups are finished they will each get a turn explaining how they opted to group the items. Each group may have vastly different conclusions, grouping by size, material, color, etc.

This activity encourages teamwork and creative thinking. It forces them to think outside the box and rethink everyday objects and problems, and find connections to things that they would typically view as entirely unrelated.

There you have it, 17 indoor team building games. Make sure you check out our other icebreaker games as well.

get-to-know-you-games

Improv Games

13 Fun Improv Games

We’ve all experienced the sometimes awkward process of getting to know new people, especially in group settings. More often than not, improv games are a great way to allow people to get to know one another in a fun fashion. Improv games are essentially games that are designed to improve on an individual’s improv acting skills in the theater. These games also make great icebreakers and are just plain fun for anybody to play. Children love the interactive rules of improv games and are much more likely to have fun because of the unpredictable nature of these games. Since there are a great variety of games, kids are not the only ones who can participate. Corporate outings and company team building exercises are also implementing improv games to encourage unity and cohesion among employees. Take a look at these 13 fun, energetic, and creative improv games from improvencyclopedia.org that can be used in a variety of settings.

Game #1: Imitation

This first game is simple and fun for any group, kids or adults. The game starts with everyone forming a circle. Someone will start by performing some kind of action, small or big, such as snapping or a dance move. The player can also opt to make a sound of some sort like a dog barking or whistling a short tune. The goofier the better. The next person in the circle will then do their best to imitate that sound or action and the next person will imitate that person and so on and so forth. The game is similar to telephone. You might think it should be simple to imitate a sound or action, but as more people attempt it, the more distorted and amusing it becomes.

Game #2: Ten Strikes and You’re Out!

This next game can be played by any age group and in small or large groups. Each individual holds up each of their fingers, representing the number of “strikes” they get before they are out. One at a time, each person will state something that is true about themselves but is hopefully not true about the other group members. For example, I could state that I own a dog. Whoever can say “I too own a dog” is safe. But whoever does not own a dog has to put a finger down. When someone runs out of fingers, they are out. The last person to have a finger up, wins. The goal is to say something that is true of you but NOT true about others, so the more unique you can make it, the better. This game encourages players to pay attention to and learn about the other group members so they can plan their turn strategically.

Game # 3: Rocks Ahead!

This game requires some props, really anything that can be placed on the ground as an obstacle such as a shoe, pillow, toys, chairs, etc. One person is picked as the Captain who is at the wheel of the “ship” but cannot see anything due to heavy fog (this member is blindfolded). The rest of the group are the mates who are on the lookout for any obstacles that might sink the ship like rocks, reefs, etc. which are represented by the various obstacles placed on the ground throughout the room. The group, using only their words, will do their best to navigate the blindfolded Captain through the obstacles without touching any of them. If so desired, you may allow the “ship” 1 or 2 brushes against an obstacle to make the game a little easier.

Game #4: Back to the Future

This game involves 2-4 players who will take a few minutes to improvise the plot for a short scene, but will not act it out. Then the audience will decide if they want to see what preceded that scene or what happens after. This game promotes teamwork among the actors and is just plain amusing for the audience.

Game #5: Turn and Trust

This next game is great for building trust and teamwork. Have the group form a circle with everyone standing really close together. The instruct the group to make a quarter-turn to the left. Then ask everyone to move in, standing even closer together. Next, ask the whole group to sit down simultaneously. If done properly, each group member will end up sitting on each other’s knees. If you really want to challenge them, instruct them to walk while sitting by telling them which foot to start with.

Game #6: Octopus

This next game is simple and is great for children. The group starts in either a circle or a line with each player holding hands. The group then moves around with an inevitable tangle of people forming. For added fun, have the group then try and untangle themselves.

Game #7: Jabbering Jargon

This improv game is structured around an individual, with audience participation. The individual starts calling out any words he/she wants with the goal of saying as many words as possible that have no association with the previous word. For example, I could say, “baseball, sky, bed, dog, lamp, light bulb” but at light bulb I would stop since there is an association between lamp and light bulb. This game encourages creativity and focus from the individual and vigilance from the group since they will be the ones stopping the individual when an association is made.

Game #8: Fast-Forward/Rewind

In this game you will need to pick a “director” and the rest of the group will serve as actors. The actors will act out a scene and at any point the director can “rewind” or “fast-forward” the scene at which point the actors will adjust their scene accordingly. This is a great game for improving impromptu skills and also forces the actors to work in unison, especially in the “fast-forward” portions of the game.

Game #9: Active Audience

This game is played with 1-3 players as the “story tellers” and the rest of the group provides assistance when the story tellers look to the crowd for creative ideas. For example, a story teller may say, “I like Italian food but my favorite food of all time is…” At this point the audience could yell out “dirty socks” or “beach towel” and the story teller would continue, “I like Italian food but my favorite food of all time is dirty socks. Dirty socks just really hit the spot when I’m famished.” The story can go for as long as you like. This is a great improv game that encourages the story tellers to tap into their creative side. It also leads to some great jokes that can be referenced for a long time.

Game #10: The Voice

This next game is great for an improv class or just a fun game for anyone to engage in. It can take place on a stage or anywhere there is ample room. The group, minus one, will come up with a scene to act out. One individual will not be acting but will instead be the voice of an “invisible character” whom the rest of the actors will have to incorporate into their scene. The “voice” is a supposed invisible character whom the actors can see but the audience cannot.

Game #11: Rumor Has It…

This is a great war-up game for any group. All players sit in a circle. The first person points at an individual and whispers, “Did you hear…?” to the person next to them. That person affirms and adds to the silly rumor. For example, the game might start with a player pointing to the person across from them and whispering to their neighbor, “Did you hear Joe has reverse aging disorder and is actually over 200 years old?” The neighbor might then gasp dramatically and whisper to their neighbor, “Did you hear Joe has reverse aging disorder and is actually over 200 years old and is from Mars?” This would continue until the person sitting next to Joe would tell the audience the collective rumors she/he heard about Joe. This game encourages creativity and emphasizes memory recall and is also sure to lead to some fun inside jokes.

Game #12: In Sync

For this game you will need to come up with three things that can be easily mimicked with hand gestures. For example if you picked a king, the sign could be to use your hands to form a crown above your head. If you picked a chicken, the sign could be to bob your head and cluck. You can pick anything, just make sure all the players know the three things agreed upon and what their signs are. At your signal, each player will pick one of the three things and will make the appropriate sign. The game continues until everyone in the group picks the same thing to act out. It is fun to watch who leads the group in which thing to act out and who is stubborn in following!

Game #13: Group Mime

This last game involves group coordination to mime a group activity. For example tug-o-war, rowing a boat, peddling a 10 person bike, etc. This game encourages suggestions from the audience and team work from the players. If there is no audience then simply ask any one of the players for a suggestion of what to mime.

There you have it, 13 fun improv games. Still need more fun game? Make sure you check out our extensive list of dice games as well.

Trampoline Games

9 Fun Trampoline Games

Trampolines are oodles of fun for all ages. Not only can you jump to your hearts content, but there are numerous games that one can partake while on the trampoline. Games are fun to play with small groups of people, but also with large groups; and are great way to organize play and activities when entertaining a crowd or hosting a party. There is a huge variety of games that can be played on a trampoline, such as the following:

Dead Man

This is an exciting game that is best played with three or more participants. To really spice things up, try it out at night! (Best played on a trampoline with a net enclosure in order to prevent anyone from falling off.)

For this game, one person is the “dead man” and sits in the middle of the trampoline with their eyes closed and counts to 10. During this time the other participants can jump, crawl, or use any other stealthy moves to steer clear of the dead man. Once the dead man has counted to 10 the other participants all shout, “Dead man rise!”

The dead man then crawls with his or her eyes closed to find and tag the other participants in order to make them the “dead man.” The dead man cannot open his or her eyes, nor can they stand while being the dead man. The other participants are allowed to move as much or as little as they wish, but they are not allowed to jump over the dead man at any point. The round ends when the dead man tags a player.

Crack the Egg

This game can easily be played with as little as two participants; but the more the merrier! It is also best played on a trampoline with a safety net enclosure so that the “egg” does not accidentally fly off the trampoline.

In crack the egg the “egg” sits in the middle of the trampoline with his or her knees pulled up to his or her chest, arms wrapped around the knees, and chin tucked down.  The other participants jump around the “egg” until he or she “cracks” – they let go of their legs. The players trying to crack the egg cannot jump within a foot of where the egg is seated, nor can the touch the egg in any way. Once the egg cracks, it is then a new players turns to be the egg.

Cherry Bomb

A soft, bouncing ball is needed, such as a basketball or volley ball, to play this game. Two or more people stand in the middle of the trampoline and one person throws the ball up in the air while yelling, “Cherry bomb!” Everyone jumps around to keep the ball hitting them, and to also keep the ball bouncing.

Each person is allotted five lives. Being touched by the ball is a loss of a life. If the ball falls off the trampoline (or on a net-enclosed trampoline, if it touches the net), all participants lose one life. You play until only one person has any lives left.

To make this game more challenging, you can have several balls bouncing on the trampoline at once!

Bouncing Balls

In this game, each person acts as the bouncing ball. One person begins by standing in the middle of the trampoline and falling down directly on their bottom and bouncing. They bounce on their bottom on the middle of the trampoline without the use of their hands as many consecutive times as they are able. When they stop bouncing, then it is the next persons turn. That person tries to surpass the first person in how many times they can bounce on their bottom. This continues until someone can no longer surpass the person before them, at which point that person is out. Each person who cannot surpass the previous person is out, until only one person remains. This game is great for any number of participants, but a minimum of two.

To make things a bit more exciting, you could play this with a sprinkler running underneath the trampoline on a hot, sunny day!

Wild Boar

In the game of Wild Boar, a game best played with a minimum or three people, one person is selected to be the wild boar. This person is blindfolded. Everyone, including the wild boar, is standing on the trampoline at all times. No one is allowed to sit or crawl. The wild boar then must try to catch one of the other players by walking or jumping. If he or she is successful, they then must identify whom they have caught without removing their blindfold. When the wild boar is correct in identifying the person whom they have caught, the person captured is now the wild boar. If they are incorrect, the wild boar must release the person and try to tag someone again, repeating until they are able to properly identify their ensnared person.

Due to the wild boar being blind folded, this game is best played on a trampoline with a safety net.

Game of TRAMP

This game is very reminiscent of “Horse” meets “Copycat” on a trampoline. It can be played with a minimum of two people, but more is certainly enjoyable.

All the participants stay on the outskirts of the trampoline while one person performs a trick in the middle. The trick may be as easy or difficult as the person desires/ Each person must then take a turn repeating the trick. If they are incapable of repeating the trick, they then earn a “T.” Each subsequent inability to mimic a trick warrants them an “R” and then an “A” and then an “M” and then a “P.” As each person earns a “P” they are out. Whoever is left having not earned all the letters after everyone else has gotten out is the winner.

For a longer game, you can spell out all of the word “trampoline.”

Telephone

Akin to the old school game of “telephone” where a whispered sentence goes down a long chain in hopes of it being the same at the end, this is also a long sequence of events that is repeated until they can no longer be remembered in order to be the same.

In this game, all the participants sit on one edge of the trampoline. One person goes first and performs a “trick,” i.e., drop on their bottom, do a pike jump, spin, etc. The next person then performs the first trick, and then adds a trick of his or her own. This sequence continues with each person correctly imitating the tricks performed prior to them, and then adding their own. This continues until someone can no longer remember the sequence correctly. Once someone does not perform it in the proper order that person is subsequently out. This continues until everyone forgets the sequence properly. The last person to perform it correctly wins.

This game could be played with as few as two players.

Slithering Snake

For the game of Slithering Snake, a minimum of three people is needed. A jump rope is also needed as the “snake.”

One person, whom is in control of the snake, stands on the side of the trampoline and moves the jump rope back and forth over the surface of the trampoline, being sure not to lift it off the surface. The players on the trampoline must jump around, avoiding the moving snake so it does not touch their shoes or ankles, and also can not run into one another. If the snake touches them, they are out. This continues until there is only one person left who has yet to be tagged by the snake.

Stealthy Ninja

Who does not dream of being a ninja? Or at least playing the part of one! For this game you need a minimum of three people. It is best played on a trampoline that has a safety net so that no one accidentally falls off.

All of the participants except for the ninja are blindfolded. The ninja then must cause each of the players to fall down; but the ninja is not allowed to kick, punch, or use any other sort of move that could actually harm the blindfolded participants.

The blindfolded individuals must then do their best to both avoid being tripped or falling down, while also trying their best to trip the ninja. If the ninja knocks down all the blindfolded players without falling down himself, he wins. If the ninja is knocked down by one of the blindfolded participants, or falls down on his own, then the blindfolded members win that round. At that time a new person is selected to be the ninja.

With some many trampoline gaming options, it is difficult to ever be bored! Most trampoline games can be spiced up by adding an element of darkness or water. And although most can be played with only two to three people, the more people the more fun and suspense!

Make sure you check out some of our best rectangular trampolines.

Gift Exchange Games for Large Groups

11 Fun Gift Exchange Games for Large Groups

Are you hosting a gift exchange and want to spice it up a little? One easy way to do that is to incorporate a fun game into the mix. It will take away some of that overwhelmed feeling and get everyone in the mood for a party. Whether you’re in charge of your child’s birthday party, a family holiday get-together, or an office party – we have you covered. We provide a list of gift exchange games for large groups so you can make things a little different this year. Make everyone stand in awe of your hosting abilities by making them have an entirely good time. Try one of these great games and report back!

White Elephant

My favorite gift giving game is the white elephant exchange. This can work amazingly with a group or even a smaller party. It’s easy to use at an office, home, or almost anywhere else. Party of what makes it so fun is its versatility.

How it works is rather simple. Everyone coming to the party brings a wrapped gift along. Those gifts are all placed in one area together. When it’s time for the actual opening, the first person chooses the gift they would most like. However, the next person can either choose a gift from the table or steal the gift from the individual before. This continues down the line until everyone ends up with a present. Those who were stolen from go back to pick up a new gift, which can’t be taken.

What makes this party game unique is the aspect of taking a gift, as well as the idea behind the gifts. While you can bring anything you like, provided it is wrapped, most people bring silly, unique gifts that you may see nowhere else. It amps up the fun factor and can make a usually stuffy situation incredibly entertaining!

Cheer Exchange

This is a fun one, and will work with any size group. It may take a bit longer with a crowd, but that just adds to the fun. Everyone goes to the destination of the party, bringing a wrapped gift at a certain price limit. Once everyone is there and settled, the game begins.

How this works is through the host giving directions to the guests. You might say something like “If you’ve already done all of your holiday shopping” or anything else. Those who fit that criterion stand up! The ones who are standing will swap gifts with each other. Then you go on to the next set of rules, trading between those standing each time. After someone has swapped, they no longer need to stand as they have a present of their own. The game continues until each person has had a chance to exchange their gift with someone else at the party.

Hot Potato

Hot Potato is known as a silly children’s game, but it can be a lot of fun for adults as well! In this scenario, everyone brings a gift, as usual. Everyone will be put into a circle (or many circles, if required) and a gift is handed out to the group.

This plays as you might expect. The person with the gift passes it on when the host starts a timer. The people pass the gift around until the timer stops. The person who is holding the gift gets to keep it. They leave the circle and are finished participating. Meanwhile, the game goes on with the next gift. This goes on until everyone has a gift in hand. It’s a fun game that will cause a lot of laughs, in my experience. I would suggest it, especially for a family get-together.

Musical Chairs

We’ve all played a game of musical chairs. However, the gift giving exchange based on it is a bit different. Everyone shows up to the party with a gift, as usual. However, when reaching the party, they then place their gift on a chair somewhere in the room.

Gameplay begins with the host starting a song, something for the holiday or occasion, and everyone circles the presents as it goes on. When the song stops, which is at the host’s discretion, the present in the seat in front of the partygoers is theirs to keep. The guests can open their gift and then use the seat for the rest of the festivities!

Secret Santa

A traditional, but fun, game rounds out the fifth spot on our list of gift exchange games for large groups. This is a name drawing game but with a bit more meat to it. How this works is that everyone participating has their name put into a hat. This occurs in the days or weeks leading up to the celebration. Once names are all collected, the host allows each person to pull a name from the hat.

It’s the responsibility of the individual who gets a name to get that person a gift. Sometimes this may be small gifts over a period of time, this is especially useful in an office situation. Other times you may just get one larger gift for the person you chose out of the hat. On the day of the actual party, each person brings a gift labeled for the person to receive it. Each participant takes their present and then after, they try to guess who bought it for them. This part can be the most fun of the whole game!

Gift Auction

No money is required for this fun game, at least no real money! Everyone brings a gift to the party and trades it in for some Monopoly money. The amount doesn’t matter as long as everyone has the same available. Once everyone is ready, the real fun can start.

The host can act as auctioneer for the gifts. A gift is presented, and people can bid their “money” on it, if it is something they think they’d like. Whoever bids the most gets the gift in the end. You would keep going until everyone had a gift, of course. This is a fun and interactive way to get a big group excited and interested in what’s going on. Everyone loves a pretend auction.

Left or Right

This one is fun and allows some creativity on the part of the host. Before the party begins, the host needs to make up a story that contains many instances of the words ‘left’ and ‘right.’ You can also find some online if you prefer, but creation can be half the fun. Once that’s done, the party gathers as normal with everyone bringing a wrapped present.

Everyone will sit with the present they brought in, and the host will explain the rules. As the host reads the story, the packages change hands to the left or right each time the host says these words. The story continues until the end. At this point, each guest has a gift in their hands. They get to keep it, and everyone can open their new and exciting parcel.

Dice Exchange

This one is an interesting one and can easily accommodate a large group of people. Everyone attending goes out and gets a gift that anyone would enjoy. They bring that present, wrapped, to the office or home where the party is going to be held. In this case, they keep these presents and are seated.

Everyone sits in a circle (or groups if there are many people) and dice are handed out. Not every person gets one; every few are handed a die, and they are then allowed to roll the die. A song of some sort, Holiday or otherwise appropriate, starts and so does the game. If the person with the die gets a 3, they get to trade the gift they brought with someone else. Whether they get a gift or not, they pass the die on to the next person and play goes around the circle. This continues until the song ends and everyone keeps the present that has landed in front of them.

Love dice games? Make sure you check out our extensive list.

The Numbers Game

Everyone shows up, and as they do, you take their gifts and mark a number on them. You will then hand them a paper with the same number on it. Ask them to write down an unusual fact about themselves. That paper goes into a hat, and the presents are all collected for later.

Once the time comes for gifting, the host will pull a piece of paper from the hat and read out the fact, but not the number. People can then guess who the fact is about. The first person to get it right gets that present and are out of the game for the rest of the time. The game continues until everyone has a shiny new gift. This one is a lot of fun, and you can get people participating pretty quickly. There’s something about fighting for a gift that gets people all riled up.

Whose Gift

If you have a group that likes to get rowdy and have a lot of fun, this one is for you. All of the gifts are wrapped and put in a central location. You decide on an order for participants in whatever way you want. You can draw names or come up with something a bit more creative.

Once the person comes to the table, they get their gift. They open it as well. Then the fun starts. The person who received the gift has to guess who brought the gift. If they get it right, their turn ends, and you move on to the next person. However, if they get it wrong, and this will happen a lot – they have to sing a song or do something equally embarrassing. This gets everyone to lighten up some and have fun. It also really makes a party exactly that. You’re already in the mood to enjoy yourself after watching everyone and perhaps making a fool of yourself, too!

Trivia

This one is especially useful for the holidays but can work at any time of year. It’s a great way to get lots of people involved and will work no matter how large the crowd. It starts as expected, with each individual showing up and bringing a nicely wrapped gift. Then they are seated with the gifts in a central area so the game can begin.

This one is fun! The host will have drawn up some trivia questions beforehand, and each will be associated with a gift. The host will show the wrapped gift and then ask the question. The players raise their hands if they know the answer. The host calls on them and whoever gets it right first gets the present associated. If it’s a holiday party, you can use holiday trivia. If it’s a birthday party, you could incorporate subjects important to the birthday person. You can go so many ways with this exchange.

Once the first person has received their gift, it moves on to the next until each person has a gift. It can get people going and excited as everyone wants to show off their smarts and get a gift to boot. This is a favorite for many, and it’s not hard to see why that is.

Gift Exchange Games

These are the best of the best when it comes to gift exchange games for large groups. You are sure to find that one works for your particular situation. Many of these are well-know, but others are less so. If you want to incorporate more creativity or want to go with something convention, both are easily possible. No matter what style you like, one of these games is bound to please you and the group coming to your party.

So get out there and be the best host there can be. With this set of ideas, you’re already well on your way to making someone’s night. Enjoy yourself and have fun. That’s the most important aspect of a gift exchange or party anyway.

Make sure you check out our best yankee swap gift ideas as well.